Years EC -10


Years EC -10


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Plants are Cool

Years 1-10

Plants are vital to life on earth, with forests referred to as the lungs of the earth. Students will learn about the diversity of New Zealand plants and the amazing adaptations they have employed to survive. Using interactive activities such as playing the possum game, data collection, puzzles and mirror walks, students will meet some of the Rotokare plant stars and gain an appreciation and understanding of all New Zealand native plants.

Key Concepts

The identification and classification of key New Zealand plants; plant evolution and adaptation; plant lifecycles; pollination; seed dispersal; photosynthesis, wetland and forest plants; stratification and the structure of the forest; conservation; and the importance of plants to humans and other animals.

Wetland Treasure Trovel

Years 1-10

Much of New Zealand's wetlands have been lost forever. Students will discover the amazing world of wetlands, and will learn about the importance of conserving our remaining wetlands. Students get to use scientific equipment to monitor the lake water quality and assess the biodiversity.

Key Concepts

Water quality; conservation; biodiversity; human impact on the environment; the value of freshwater and wetlands.

Nature's Recycling

Years 1-10

Nothing is wasted in nature; unlike humans, nature has no need for a wheelie bin! Different organisms form natures "clean-up crew" who ensure the nutrient cycle continues. Students experience firsthand how the forest lives and dies, meeting key members of natures clean-up crew along the way.

Key Concepts

Decomposition; food webs; interdependence; nutrient cycling; waste and recycling; impacts of human waste on the environment.

Conservation and Biodiversity

Years 1-10

A very broad unit where students assume a detective role, moving as teams around short scientific stations, as they piece together clues to enable a better understanding of the concept studied. Special attention is given to the importance of conservation and the scientific methods used in conservation.

Key Concepts

Biodiversity; conservation; the sanctuary concept; pests and predators; plant and animal adaptation and evolution; sustainability.

Extraordinary Ecosystems

Years 1-8

A healthy functioning ecosystem requires the interdependence of both living and non-living factors. Students will appreciate the balance of New Zealand's native ecosystems and understand how humans have altered these environments with the introduction of exotic plants and animals. Students get a hands-on experience collecting data from the different aspects of one or more different ecosystems.

Key Concepts

Food webs and chains; trophic levels; nutrient cycling; interdependence; abiotic and biotic factors; ecosystem services.

What is that?

Years 1-10

An introduction to the world of animals and/or plants. Students will enjoy hands on activities discovering classification- what makes an animal and a plant and their special adaptations (bird beak/food matching, camouflage game etc). The option is to look at Rotokare as a case study for the importance of conservation in New Zealand. Why is such a mainland island so important?

Key Concepts

Classification and identification of plants and animals; biodiversity of native plant and animal life; the sanctuary concept; the importance of mainland islands for conservation.

A Sensory Explosion!

ECE, Year 1

Explore the sights, sounds and smells of the forest and wetlands. Students enjoy sensory awareness activities to explore the environment. Armed with artist palettes, magnifying glasses and blindfolds, students are empowered to discover native environments in a simple, yet powerful way.

Key Concepts

Our senses; biodiversity; colours and shapes in nature; confidence and awareness in the forest and wetlands.

Stewardship Superheros

Years 7-10

Students are drawn into an interactive drama (which is catered specifically to each classes needs). Their journey begins at school, where they are introduced to a specific scenario. During the visit they all become young scientists gathering any evidence (bug hunts, bird counts, vegetation studies etc) to aid them in the drama that will unfold in the education centre. Drama scenarios could include: an environmental court hearing, a community or political debate, or aiding an alien planet with conservation advice.

Key Concepts

Kaitiakitanga (stewardship); conservation and sustainability; social action and environmental responsibility; the importance of balance between conservation, economics and recreation. The values of natural environments (wetlands and forests).

Ko te Tikanga Manaaki a te Maori te Ngahere

Years 1-10

When maori arrived in Aotearoa, there weren't any supermarkets or hospitals. They relied on the forest, wetlands, ocean and sea to survive. Students will get an insight into these amazing traditions, by taking part in a range of hands-on activities which may include harakeke (flax) weaving, creating traps for food, medicine and poultices to stop bleeding, making bird callers and tasting traditional teas.

Key Concepts

Traditional medicinal use of plants; food and clothing, kaitiakitanga (stewardship); the importance of wetlands to maori.